296 Iloilo City Goverment

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2014-09-12 15:11:04
 

History of Urban Growth of Iloilo City

Pre-Spanish Period

As with other civilizations, Filipino settlements began along bodies of water. In Iloilo, the typical dwelling was the hut made of bamboo and grass or palm, which lined up along the coasts or the banks of Jaro, Iloilo and Batiano Rivers. Rich landscape of forests, ricefields, mountains or brush and bamboo thicket provided the natives with materials for clothing, shelter and tools. The simple ways of Ilonggos were reflected in the lack of public buildings or places of worship.

Spanish Period

Under Spanish colonization the early type of dispersed settlement called barangays evolved into towns (pueblos) and provinces (alcaldias). Parish churches, beside the nearby town hall (casa tribunal) and town plaza, became the heart of town plans. From the town center, residences filled up the streets which radiated in a grid-iron pattern. Today, the town plaza remains a center of public and religious celebrations.

The seat of government was first set up along the coastlines of Arevalo, which was always under the threat of Muslim or Dutch pirates. Political survival prompted the Spaniards to transfer the seat to Ogtong (now Oton) and eventually near the mouth of Iloilo River (now Fort San Pedro). Since its establishment, a radial road network which radiates from the fort is still being used today.

American Period

In Iloilo, the American Period brought about further economic development through road networks. The British cannot only be credited for strengthening the booming sugar industry. In 1857, Nicholas Loney, the first British vice-consul in Iloilo, was responsible for the kilometer long Road Calle Progreso (now Isidro de Rama Street), which linked the warehouse (bodegas) of sugar with the Iloilo towns. Loney also led the gradual reclamation of the whole western bank of the river and eventual relocation of the business center to the nearby Calle Real (now J.M. Basa Street).

The 1920s witnessed the introduction of the working class districts (barrio obreros) to accommodate the low-income labor sector. Barrio Obrero was established in Lapaz to the north of the Iloilo River’s mouth. During this time, Art Nouveau and Neo-Colonial architecture also flourished in the city’s downtown. Typical designs were arcaded ground floors set back in near straight alignments.

Although Manila was the focus of planning then, Iloilo was elevated as chartered city on 16 July 1937. During this time, Ilonggos, who received American grants to study architecture abroad, returned and brought American architecture to their homes. Usual Commonwealth elements were the eagle, scroll and olive leaves.

By the end of World War II, Iloilo’s blooming economy was in ruins. The decline in sugar economy and exodus of people and investors to other cities such as Bacolod and Cebu, led further to its economic demise.

Iloilo gradually recovered as the planning focus was on reconstructing and reviving war-torn Philippines. In 1959, Iloilo City joined other chartered cities in implementing the urban planning strategies and policies of the National Planning Commission.

Modern Period

The next three decades saw the moderate growth of Iloilo City with the establishment of fish ports, an international seaport, and other commercial firms. Iloilo City also became the Regional Center of Western Visayas.

In 1977, a Comprehensive Urban Development Plan for Iloilo City was approved and was adopted by the Sangguniang Panlungsod. The Land Use Plan and Zoning Ordinance was the implementing tool. However, the 1977 Plan was unable to cope with the demands of rapid urbanization.

By the end of 1993, a multi-sectoral group prepared the 1994-2010 Comprehensive Development Plan of Iloilo City to amend the old plan and address the present and future challenges of urban development. The plan, however, was not carried pending the approval of the Housing and Land Use Regulatory Board (HLURB).

Modern Period

The next three decades saw the moderate growth of Iloilo City with the establishment of fish ports, an international seaport, and other commercial firms. Iloilo City also became the Regional Center of Western Visayas.

In 1977, a Comprehensive Urban Development Plan for Iloilo City was approved and was adopted by the Sangguniang Panlungsod. The Land Use Plan and Zoning Ordinance was the implementing tool. However, the 1977 Plan was unable to cope with the demands of rapid urbanization.

By the end of 1993, a multi-sectoral group prepared the 1994-2010 Comprehensive Development Plan of Iloilo City to amend the old plan and address the present and future challenges of urban development. The plan, however, was not carried pending the approval of the Housing and Land Use Regulatory Board (HLURB).

Fast Facts

The word “Iloilo City” came from the shape of the city, cut by the river which looks like the shape of a nose, “Irong-Irong”, nose-like, later became Iloilo. Other accounts point the origin of the name to a fish.

Monicker: “Most Loyal and Noble City” or “La Muy Leal Y Noble Ciuded de Iloilo” in Spanish. This is an inscription in the Coat of Arms from the Royal Decree of 1896 in recognition of the people’s loyalty to the Spanish crown.

A replica of the Spanish Crown architechtural structure can be seen in the Arevalo District of the City.

 

Zip code: 5000

Area Code: 33

Land Area: 78.34 square kilometers

Population: 457,209 (projected SEP 2014)

Population Density: 5,836 persons per square kilometer

Number of Households: 90,681 (2010 Census)

Population Growth: 1.49% (2010 Census)

Coastline Area: 21.3 kilometers

Riverfront: 113 kilometers

Literacy Rate: 92.8 %

Lingua franca: Filipino, Hiligaynon, Kinaray-a, English


Economic activity:
Service sector : 82%
Industry : 14%
Agriculture : 4%

Climate
Iloilo City’s climate is moonsonal and has two (2) pronounced seasons namely, the dry and wet seasons. The following are the tables of the 2009 Meteorological Profile, Climatological Data and the Tropical Cyclones.

Political Boundaries
The City of Iloilo is composed of six (6) Districts and One Hundred Eighty (180) barangays, namely:

District

No. of Barangays

   

Arevalo

14

City Proper

45

Jaro

42

La Paz

37

Mandurriao

18

Molo

25

Total

180

 

Topography

Land features is flat and low level mass. 90% of land mass has an elevation of 2.637 meters above the main level water. 10% of land mass has an elevation of 5.19 meters.

Source: Iloilo City Planning and Development Office

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